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authorTudor Florea <tudor.florea@enea.com>2015-10-09 20:59:03 (GMT)
committerTudor Florea <tudor.florea@enea.com>2015-10-09 20:59:03 (GMT)
commit972dcfcdbfe75dcfeb777150c136576cf1a71e99 (patch)
tree97a61cd7e293d7ae9d56ef7ed0f81253365bb026 /README.hardware
downloadpoky-972dcfcdbfe75dcfeb777150c136576cf1a71e99.tar.gz
initial commit for Enea Linux 5.0 arm
Signed-off-by: Tudor Florea <tudor.florea@enea.com>
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1 Poky Hardware README
2 ====================
3
4This file gives details about using Poky with the reference machines
5supported out of the box. A full list of supported reference target machines
6can be found by looking in the following directories:
7
8 meta/conf/machine/
9 meta-yocto-bsp/conf/machine/
10
11If you are in doubt about using Poky/OpenEmbedded with your hardware, consult
12the documentation for your board/device.
13
14Support for additional devices is normally added by creating BSP layers - for
15more information please see the Yocto Board Support Package (BSP) Developer's
16Guide - documentation source is in documentation/bspguide or download the PDF
17from:
18
19 http://yoctoproject.org/documentation
20
21Support for physical reference hardware has now been split out into a
22meta-yocto-bsp layer which can be removed separately from other layers if not
23needed.
24
25
26QEMU Emulation Targets
27======================
28
29To simplify development, the build system supports building images to
30work with the QEMU emulator in system emulation mode. Several architectures
31are currently supported:
32
33 * ARM (qemuarm)
34 * x86 (qemux86)
35 * x86-64 (qemux86-64)
36 * PowerPC (qemuppc)
37 * MIPS (qemumips)
38
39Use of the QEMU images is covered in the Yocto Project Reference Manual.
40The appropriate MACHINE variable value corresponding to the target is given
41in brackets.
42
43
44Hardware Reference Boards
45=========================
46
47The following boards are supported by the meta-yocto-bsp layer:
48
49 * Texas Instruments Beaglebone (beaglebone)
50 * Freescale MPC8315E-RDB (mpc8315e-rdb)
51
52For more information see the board's section below. The appropriate MACHINE
53variable value corresponding to the board is given in brackets.
54
55Reference Board Maintenance
56===========================
57
58Send pull requests, patches, comments or questions about meta-yocto-bsps to poky@yoctoproject.org
59
60Maintainers: Kevin Hao <kexin.hao@windriver.com>
61 Bruce Ashfield <bruce.ashfield@windriver.com>
62
63Consumer Devices
64================
65
66The following consumer devices are supported by the meta-yocto-bsp layer:
67
68 * Intel x86 based PCs and devices (genericx86)
69 * Ubiquiti Networks EdgeRouter Lite (edgerouter)
70
71For more information see the device's section below. The appropriate MACHINE
72variable value corresponding to the device is given in brackets.
73
74
75
76 Specific Hardware Documentation
77 ===============================
78
79
80Intel x86 based PCs and devices (genericx86)
81==========================================
82
83The genericx86 MACHINE is tested on the following platforms:
84
85Intel Xeon/Core i-Series:
86 + Intel Romley Server: Sandy Bridge Xeon processor, C600 PCH (Patsburg), (Canoe Pass CRB)
87 + Intel Romley Server: Ivy Bridge Xeon processor, C600 PCH (Patsburg), (Intel SDP S2R3)
88 + Intel Crystal Forest Server: Sandy Bridge Xeon processor, DH89xx PCH (Cave Creek), (Stargo CRB)
89 + Intel Chief River Mobile: Ivy Bridge Mobile processor, QM77 PCH (Panther Point-M), (Emerald Lake II CRB, Sabino Canyon CRB)
90 + Intel Huron River Mobile: Sandy Bridge processor, QM67 PCH (Cougar Point), (Emerald Lake CRB, EVOC EC7-1817LNAR board)
91 + Intel Calpella Platform: Core i7 processor, QM57 PCH (Ibex Peak-M), (Red Fort CRB, Emerson MATXM CORE-411-B)
92 + Intel Nehalem/Westmere-EP Server: Xeon 56xx/55xx processors, 5520 chipset, ICH10R IOH (82801), (Hanlan Creek CRB)
93 + Intel Nehalem Workstation: Xeon 56xx/55xx processors, System SC5650SCWS (Greencity CRB)
94 + Intel Picket Post Server: Xeon 56xx/55xx processors (Jasper Forest), 3420 chipset (Ibex Peak), (Osage CRB)
95 + Intel Storage Platform: Sandy Bridge Xeon processor, C600 PCH (Patsburg), (Oak Creek Canyon CRB)
96 + Intel Shark Bay Client Platform: Haswell processor, LynxPoint PCH, (Walnut Canyon CRB, Lava Canyon CRB, Basking Ridge CRB, Flathead Creek CRB)
97 + Intel Shark Bay Ultrabook Platform: Haswell ULT processor, Lynx Point-LP PCH, (WhiteTip Mountain 1 CRB)
98
99Intel Atom platforms:
100 + Intel embedded Menlow: Intel Atom Z510/530 CPU, System Controller Hub US15W (Portwell NANO-8044)
101 + Intel Luna Pier: Intel Atom N4xx/D5xx series CPU (aka: Pineview-D & -M), 82801HM I/O Hub (ICH8M), (Advantech AIMB-212, Moon Creek CRB)
102 + Intel Queens Bay platform: Intel Atom E6xx CPU (aka: Tunnel Creek), Topcliff EG20T I/O Hub (Emerson NITX-315, Crown Bay CRB, Minnow Board)
103 + Intel Fish River Island platform: Intel Atom E6xx CPU (aka: Tunnel Creek), Topcliff EG20T I/O Hub (Kontron KM2M806)
104 + Intel Cedar Trail platform: Intel Atom N2000 & D2000 series CPU (aka: Cedarview), NM10 Express Chipset (Norco kit BIS-6630, Cedar Rock CRB)
105
106and is likely to work on many unlisted Atom/Core/Xeon based devices. The MACHINE
107type supports ethernet, wifi, sound, and Intel/vesa graphics by default in
108addition to common PC input devices, busses, and so on. Note that it does not
109included the binary-only graphic drivers used on some Atom platforms, for
110accelerated graphics on these machines please refer to meta-intel.
111
112Depending on the device, it can boot from a traditional hard-disk, a USB device,
113or over the network. Writing generated images to physical media is
114straightforward with a caveat for USB devices. The following examples assume the
115target boot device is /dev/sdb, be sure to verify this and use the correct
116device as the following commands are run as root and are not reversable.
117
118USB Device:
119 1. Build a live image. This image type consists of a simple filesystem
120 without a partition table, which is suitable for USB keys, and with the
121 default setup for the genericx86 machine, this image type is built
122 automatically for any image you build. For example:
123
124 $ bitbake core-image-minimal
125
126 2. Use the "dd" utility to write the image to the raw block device. For
127 example:
128
129 # dd if=core-image-minimal-genericx86.hddimg of=/dev/sdb
130
131 If the device fails to boot with "Boot error" displayed, or apparently
132 stops just after the SYSLINUX version banner, it is likely the BIOS cannot
133 understand the physical layout of the disk (or rather it expects a
134 particular layout and cannot handle anything else). There are two possible
135 solutions to this problem:
136
137 1. Change the BIOS USB Device setting to HDD mode. The label will vary by
138 device, but the idea is to force BIOS to read the Cylinder/Head/Sector
139 geometry from the device.
140
141 2. Without such an option, the BIOS generally boots the device in USB-ZIP
142 mode. To write an image to a USB device that will be bootable in
143 USB-ZIP mode, carry out the following actions:
144
145 a. Determine the geometry of your USB device using fdisk:
146
147 # fdisk /dev/sdb
148 Command (m for help): p
149
150 Disk /dev/sdb: 4011 MB, 4011491328 bytes
151 124 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1019 cylinders, total 7834944 sectors
152 ...
153
154 Command (m for help): q
155
156 b. Configure the USB device for USB-ZIP mode:
157
158 # mkdiskimage -4 /dev/sdb 1019 124 62
159
160 Where 1019, 124 and 62 are the cylinder, head and sectors/track counts
161 as reported by fdisk (substitute the values reported for your device).
162 When the operation has finished and the access LED (if any) on the
163 device stops flashing, remove and reinsert the device to allow the
164 kernel to detect the new partition layout.
165
166 c. Copy the contents of the image to the USB-ZIP mode device:
167
168 # mkdir /tmp/image
169 # mkdir /tmp/usbkey
170 # mount -o loop core-image-minimal-genericx86.hddimg /tmp/image
171 # mount /dev/sdb4 /tmp/usbkey
172 # cp -rf /tmp/image/* /tmp/usbkey
173
174 d. Install the syslinux boot loader:
175
176 # syslinux /dev/sdb4
177
178 e. Unmount everything:
179
180 # umount /tmp/image
181 # umount /tmp/usbkey
182
183 Install the boot device in the target board and configure the BIOS to boot
184 from it.
185
186 For more details on the USB-ZIP scenario, see the syslinux documentation:
187 http://git.kernel.org/?p=boot/syslinux/syslinux.git;a=blob_plain;f=doc/usbkey.txt;hb=HEAD
188
189
190Texas Instruments Beaglebone (beaglebone)
191=========================================
192
193The Beaglebone is an ARM Cortex-A8 development board with USB, Ethernet, 2D/3D
194accelerated graphics, audio, serial, JTAG, and SD/MMC. The Black adds a faster
195CPU, more RAM, eMMC flash and a micro HDMI port. The beaglebone MACHINE is
196tested on the following platforms:
197
198 o Beaglebone Black A6
199 o Beaglebone A6 (the original "White" model)
200
201The Beaglebone Black has eMMC, while the White does not. Pressing the USER/BOOT
202button when powering on will temporarily change the boot order. But for the sake
203of simplicity, these instructions assume you have erased the eMMC on the Black,
204so its boot behavior matches that of the White and boots off of SD card. To do
205this, issue the following commands from the u-boot prompt:
206
207 # mmc dev 1
208 # mmc erase 0 512
209
210To further tailor these instructions for your board, please refer to the
211documentation at http://www.beagleboard.org/bone and http://www.beagleboard.org/black
212
213From a Linux system with access to the image files perform the following steps
214as root, replacing mmcblk0* with the SD card device on your machine (such as sdc
215if used via a usb card reader):
216
217 1. Partition and format an SD card:
218 # fdisk -lu /dev/mmcblk0
219
220 Disk /dev/mmcblk0: 3951 MB, 3951034368 bytes
221 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 480 cylinders, total 7716864 sectors
222 Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
223
224 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
225 /dev/mmcblk0p1 * 63 144584 72261 c Win95 FAT32 (LBA)
226 /dev/mmcblk0p2 144585 465884 160650 83 Linux
227
228 # mkfs.vfat -F 16 -n "boot" /dev/mmcblk0p1
229 # mke2fs -j -L "root" /dev/mmcblk0p2
230
231 The following assumes the SD card partitions 1 and 2 are mounted at
232 /media/boot and /media/root respectively. Removing the card and reinserting
233 it will do just that on most modern Linux desktop environments.
234
235 The files referenced below are made available after the build in
236 build/tmp/deploy/images.
237
238 2. Install the boot loaders
239 # cp MLO-beaglebone /media/boot/MLO
240 # cp u-boot-beaglebone.img /media/boot/u-boot.img
241
242 3. Install the root filesystem
243 # tar x -C /media/root -f core-image-$IMAGE_TYPE-beaglebone.tar.bz2
244
245 4. If using core-image-base or core-image-sato images, the SD card is ready
246 and rootfs already contains the kernel, modules and device tree (DTB)
247 files necessary to be booted with U-boot's default configuration, so
248 skip directly to step 8.
249 For core-image-minimal, proceed through next steps.
250
251 5. If using core-image-minimal rootfs, install the modules
252 # tar x -C /media/root -f modules-beaglebone.tgz
253
254 6. If using core-image-minimal rootfs, install the kernel uImage into /boot
255 directory of rootfs
256 # cp uImage-beaglebone.bin /media/root/boot/uImage
257
258 7. If using core-image-minimal rootfs, also install device tree (DTB) files
259 into /boot directory of rootfs
260 # cp uImage-am335x-bone.dtb /media/root/boot/am335x-bone.dtb
261 # cp uImage-am335x-boneblack.dtb /media/root/boot/am335x-boneblack.dtb
262
263 8. Unmount the SD partitions, insert the SD card into the Beaglebone, and
264 boot the Beaglebone
265
266
267Freescale MPC8315E-RDB (mpc8315e-rdb)
268=====================================
269
270The MPC8315 PowerPC reference platform (MPC8315E-RDB) is aimed at hardware and
271software development of network attached storage (NAS) and digital media server
272applications. The MPC8315E-RDB features the PowerQUICC II Pro processor, which
273includes a built-in security accelerator.
274
275(Note: you may find it easier to order MPC8315E-RDBA; this appears to be the
276same board in an enclosure with accessories. In any case it is fully
277compatible with the instructions given here.)
278
279Setup instructions
280------------------
281
282You will need the following:
283* NFS root setup on your workstation
284* TFTP server installed on your workstation
285* Straight-thru 9-conductor serial cable (DB9, M/F) connected from your
286 PC to UART1
287* Ethernet connected to the first ethernet port on the board
288
289--- Preparation ---
290
291Note: if you have altered your board's ethernet MAC address(es) from the
292defaults, or you need to do so because you want multiple boards on the same
293network, then you will need to change the values in the dts file (patch
294linux/arch/powerpc/boot/dts/mpc8315erdb.dts within the kernel source). If
295you have left them at the factory default then you shouldn't need to do
296anything here.
297
298--- Booting from NFS root ---
299
300Load the kernel and dtb (device tree blob), and boot the system as follows:
301
302 1. Get the kernel (uImage-mpc8315e-rdb.bin) and dtb (uImage-mpc8315e-rdb.dtb)
303 files from the tmp/deploy directory, and make them available on your TFTP
304 server.
305
306 2. Connect the board's first serial port to your workstation and then start up
307 your favourite serial terminal so that you will be able to interact with
308 the serial console. If you don't have a favourite, picocom is suggested:
309
310 $ picocom /dev/ttyUSB0 -b 115200
311
312 3. Power up or reset the board and press a key on the terminal when prompted
313 to get to the U-Boot command line
314
315 4. Set up the environment in U-Boot:
316
317 => setenv ipaddr <board ip>
318 => setenv serverip <tftp server ip>
319 => setenv bootargs root=/dev/nfs rw nfsroot=<nfsroot ip>:<rootfs path> ip=<board ip>:<server ip>:<gateway ip>:255.255.255.0:mpc8315e:eth0:off console=ttyS0,115200
320
321 5. Download the kernel and dtb, and boot:
322
323 => tftp 1000000 uImage-mpc8315e-rdb.bin
324 => tftp 2000000 uImage-mpc8315e-rdb.dtb
325 => bootm 1000000 - 2000000
326
327--- Booting from JFFS2 root ---
328
329 1. First boot the board with NFS root.
330
331 2. Erase the MTD partition which will be used as root:
332
333 $ flash_eraseall /dev/mtd3
334
335 3. Copy the JFFS2 image to the MTD partition:
336
337 $ flashcp core-image-minimal-mpc8315e-rdb.jffs2 /dev/mtd3
338
339 4. Then reboot the board and set up the environment in U-Boot:
340
341 => setenv bootargs root=/dev/mtdblock3 rootfstype=jffs2 console=ttyS0,115200
342
343
344Ubiquiti Networks EdgeRouter Lite (edgerouter)
345==============================================
346
347The EdgeRouter Lite is part of the EdgeMax series. It is a MIPS64 router
348(based on the Cavium Octeon processor) with 512MB of RAM, which uses an
349internal USB pendrive for storage.
350
351Setup instructions
352------------------
353
354You will need the following:
355* NFS root setup on your workstation
356* TFTP server installed on your workstation
357* RJ45 -> serial ("rollover") cable connected from your PC to the CONSOLE
358 port on the board
359* Ethernet connected to the first ethernet port on the board
360
361--- Preparation ---
362
363Build an image (e.g. core-image-minimal) using "edgerouter" as the MACHINE.
364In the following instruction it is based on core-image-minimal. Another target
365may be similiar with it.
366
367--- Booting from NFS root ---
368
369Load the kernel, and boot the system as follows:
370
371 1. Get the kernel (vmlinux) file from the tmp/deploy/images/edgerouter
372 directory, and make them available on your TFTP server.
373
374 2. Connect the board's first serial port to your workstation and then start up
375 your favourite serial terminal so that you will be able to interact with
376 the serial console. If you don't have a favourite, picocom is suggested:
377
378 $ picocom /dev/ttyS0 -b 115200
379
380 3. Power up or reset the board and press a key on the terminal when prompted
381 to get to the U-Boot command line
382
383 4. Set up the environment in U-Boot:
384
385 => setenv ipaddr <board ip>
386 => setenv serverip <tftp server ip>
387
388 5. Download the kernel and boot:
389
390 => tftp tftp $loadaddr vmlinux
391 => bootoctlinux $loadaddr coremask=0x3 root=/dev/nfs rw nfsroot=<nfsroot ip>:<rootfs path> ip=<board ip>:<server ip>:<gateway ip>:<netmask>:edgerouter:eth0:off mtdparts=phys_mapped_flash:512k(boot0),512k(boot1),64k@3072k(eeprom)
392
393--- Booting from USB root ---
394
395To boot from the USB disk, you either need to remove it from the edgerouter
396box and populate it from another computer, or use a previously booted NFS
397image and populate from the edgerouter itself.
398
399Type 1: Mounted USB disk
400------------------------
401
402To boot from the USB disk there are two available partitions on the factory
403USB storage. The rest of this guide assumes that these partitions are left
404intact. If you change the partition scheme, you must update your boot method
405appropriately.
406
407The standard partitions are:
408
409 - 1: vfat partition containing factory kernels
410 - 2: ext3 partition for the root filesystem.
411
412You can place the kernel on either partition 1, or partition 2, but the roofs
413must go on partition 2 (due to its size).
414
415Note: If you place the kernel on the ext3 partition, you must re-create the
416 ext3 filesystem, since the factory u-boot can only handle 128 byte inodes and
417 cannot read the partition otherwise.
418
419Steps:
420
421 1. Remove the USB disk from the edgerouter and insert it into a computer
422 that has access to your build artifacts.
423
424 2. Copy the kernel image to the USB storage (assuming discovered as 'sdb' on
425 the development machine):
426
427 2a) if booting from vfat
428
429 # mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt
430 # cp tmp/deploy/images/edgerouter/vmlinux /mnt
431 # umount /mnt
432
433 2b) if booting from ext3
434
435 # mkfs.ext3 -I 128 /dev/sdb2
436 # mount /dev/sdb2 /mnt
437 # mkdir /mnt/boot
438 # cp tmp/deploy/images/edgerouter/vmlinux /mnt/boot
439 # umount /mnt
440
441 3. Extract the rootfs to the USB storage ext3 partition
442
443 # mount /dev/sdb2 /mnt
444 # tar -xvjpf core-image-minimal-XXX.tar.bz2 -C /mnt
445 # umount /mnt
446
447 4. Reboot the board and press a key on the terminal when prompted to get to the U-Boot
448 command line:
449
450 5. Load the kernel and boot:
451
452 5a) vfat boot
453
454 => fatload usb 0:1 $loadaddr vmlinux
455
456 5b) ext3 boot
457
458 => ext2load usb 0:2 $loadaddr boot/vmlinux
459
460 => bootoctlinux $loadaddr coremask=0x3 root=/dev/sda2 rw rootwait mtdparts=phys_mapped_flash:512k(boot0),512k(boot1),64k@3072k(eeprom)
461
462
463Type 2: NFS
464-----------
465
466Note: If you place the kernel on the ext3 partition, you must re-create the
467 ext3 filesystem, since the factory u-boot can only handle 128 byte inodes and
468 cannot read the partition otherwise.
469
470 These boot instructions assume that you have recreated the ext3 filesystem with
471 128 byte inodes, you have an updated uboot or you are running and image capable
472 of making the filesystem on the board itself.
473
474
475 1. Boot from NFS root
476
477 2. Mount the USB disk partition 2 and then extract the contents of
478 tmp/deploy/core-image-XXXX.tar.bz2 into it.
479
480 Before starting, copy core-image-minimal-xxx.tar.bz2 and vmlinux into
481 rootfs path on your workstation.
482
483 and then,
484
485 # mount /dev/sda2 /media/sda2
486 # tar -xvjpf core-image-minimal-XXX.tar.bz2 -C /media/sda2
487 # cp vmlinux /media/sda2/boot/vmlinux
488 # umount /media/sda2
489 # reboot
490
491 3. Reboot the board and press a key on the terminal when prompted to get to the U-Boot
492 command line:
493
494 # reboot
495
496 4. Load the kernel and boot:
497
498 => ext2load usb 0:2 $loadaddr boot/vmlinux
499 => bootoctlinux $loadaddr coremask=0x3 root=/dev/sda2 rw rootwait mtdparts=phys_mapped_flash:512k(boot0),512k(boot1),64k@3072k(eeprom)